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20130113
20130121
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of rules that have been established that are impossible to meet without doing severe damage to the economy. we're not going to put ourselves in a position where, in order to pay for the spending we have already incurred, where the two options are we were way to either profoundly hurt the economy, hurt seniors, hurt kids trying to go to college or we will blow up the economy. we will not do that. not whatever congress does. they will have to send me something that is sensible. we should not be doing this in a one-three month time when. why should we do that? where the united states of america. we cannot manage our affairs in such a way that we pay our bills and provide certainty in terms of how we pay our bills? look. i do not think anyone would consider my position on reasonable. major, i am happy to have a conversation about how we reduce our deficits. i'm not going to have a monthly or every three months conversation about whether or not we pay our bills. that in and of itself does severe damage. even the threat of default hurts our economy. it hurts our economy as we speak. if we want t
, for our economy cannot be overstated. the sovereign debt of the united states, for it to be questions that we would pay our bills or not, is not a scenario that we want to go through as a country. that would really harm us. that said, as i was coming back on the train from new york, i shared this with those with me. i said you're going down this track at 130 miles an hour. what would cause the conductor, knowing that if he veers off on this next rail to the right and pulled the switch that would cause that to happen, even if he knew it would put the train at severe risk by veering off to the right, what would be the only reason a person would go off that course rather than go straight? and the reason is that there's a larger cavern, kind of a grand canyon that we are about to go off. here's what i have concluded as a businessman and a seasoned public servant. the music will stop at some point with respect to where we are. when we are pouring $1 trillion a year, 40 cents on the dollar, you cannot do that into perpetuity. the time for leadership is right now. the time to address this is
' medical facilities, and help keep the economy moving by funding necessary repairs, small business loans, and recovery aid for businesses of all sizes. my committee thoroughly examined the emergency request, listened to the needs of the people and the region, and assessed the most pressing needs to determine the funding levels paid in this bill. we crafted this legislation responsibly, giving the administration's request and the senate passed bill a hard scrub to eliminate unnecessary spending. we have removed objectionable provisions added by the senate and have adjusted funding levels to make the best use of taxpayer dollars. as we know, we face precarious fiscal times and it's essential that congress make responsible decisions to ensure efficient and effective spending. taking cues from previous efforts we have included important oversight measures to prevent abuse and ensure that federal agencies are using these funds effectively and appropriately. this is not the first major natural disaster nor unfortunately will it be the last. one of the great attributes of the american people ha
because that is a big part of the economy here. and what has happened over the years is essentially there is only so much hay and water you can haul. pretty soon people had to do something with their livestock and they were in such poor condition that by the time they realized that over 30,000 cattle died. allotted times drought mitigation plans will decline for two or three years so we have to think about the way we plan for droughts in what we do. >> there are two more questions right there. this one i want to go to roger. do you think that we will be seeing mega-droughts taking place in more parts of the country and then we are going to hit back on a policy question. >> the answer to that is most likely, but the reason why it is most likely because it happened in the past. during the years 900 to 12 or 1300 we had extended periods of drought in the colorado basin, anywhere from 60 to 100 years in the record. when we have an increasing temperature it does not necessarily cause a drought, but it exacerbates the conditions related to drought for the reasons i mentioned related to ar
and mathematics backgrounds to stay in the u.s., use those skills to grow our economy, help our country, rather than go back to their home country. host: the white house sees hope for bipartisan deal on immigration based on what senator marco rubio of florida, republican, has put out there. he's put some ideas out there. do you -- do you endorse liz ideas? guest: i have not spoken to senator rubio yet, but we welcome those ideas. there are others in the house that are working on specific proposals and wider ranging proposals, and we want to take a look at this. you know, we are a nation of immigrants. there is not a person to be found who's a u.s. citizen who can't go back a few generations or several generations and find someone in their family who came to the united states to better their lives. my grandfather came from germany. my wife's parents came from ireland. this is a very, very common thing. we are also a nation of laws. so finding a way to address this issue and fix a very broken immigration system will entail looking at a lot of different pieces of this, including enforcement and wh
of this country, because the consequences of a default would ripple throughout the economy. i just saw an article yesterday that said the people are now drawing on their retirement funds, the middle class of this country. so we now want to have a debt ceiling threat that would cause further erosion in the stock market, that would essentially make things begin to go haywire? i guess the republicans are going to be thinking this weekend how to proceed. i think they need to proceed with sensibility and common sense instead of an effort to be so extreme that you threaten the economy of the country. host: house republicans leaving for a retreat tomorrow to discuss - guest: they should retreat from the idea of using the debt ceiling. host: you referenced "the wall street journal" this morning. many republicans see a debt limit showdown as risky. pat toomey said tuesday he would introduce legislation next reconstructing the white house to prioritize the government's bills. what's wrong with that idea? guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had ove
or to radically, giving too much money into many loans purses to few. banks are important part of the economy and the finance new job growth and the ability of people to buy a home, which is the largest single investment that they will make. we really need for them to be there to help the consumers and businesses finance their operations. the balancing act is not being too strict so that they will draw in and not land but not being too lax. that is a fine line. we shall we shallthe cfpb has achieve that with these rules. financial institutions will complain about any regulation because they did not want to be subject to kinds of rules that instruct them in how to do their business. when you read the complaints from the financial industry, i would say we have to take some of those with a grain of salt. host: gretchen morgenson is the "the new york times" assistant business and financial editor. she was co-author of "reckless endangerment.' guest: who basically were the interco parties in creating the crisis decades later. host: don is next from clifton, virginia. caller: a good time to segue t
and the economy and education, we know how they're strapped. i have four s.r.o.'s at one time. i now have one. that's not a desired situation by the school or by my department. yes to the funding piece. to the mental health piece, the s.r.o.'s, they know the kids. they know when they don't look right. what's going on today? they have friendships and they talk. someone else will say, have you seen his facebook page, or i am being taken down, bullied on facebook and all the things that lead us to mental health issues. and in regard to mental health issues, today, the officer on the street gets called because someone is having an episode of some nature and maybe a family member calls or maybe a co-worker calls or maybe they're just out and about having some sort of episode. the officer comes, evalue waits and determines, something is going on. this person needs to be seen. they've committed no crime a lot of the time, but you can't believe. so they in minnesota and i think this is similar throughout our country execute what's called the 72-hour hold. a lot of people say, good. the situation is r
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8